Note: this article is a public draft of the Sharing Manual. The content can and will be changed during the project and as long as this message is displayed. If you have suggestions for improvements or any questions, please leave a comment underneath or send us a message through the contact form.


Most conventional content platforms, like Flickr, Vimeo and Youtube, only give credit to one person or organization when the content is embedded or reused on the same or other platforms: the account that was used to upload the content.

Sometimes you are able to add credits in the description or add team members (for example: credits on Vimeo), but this information is not shown hen the content is embedded and is often forgotten to be included with remixes. The important question therefor is: who will get (mainly) the credit? In other words: are you commissioning someone to create work for you? Or are you giving an assigment?

The Dutch political party D66 lets creators upload shareable photos to Flickr. The benefits are that the photographer has followers who regurarly add photos to Wikipedia articles. These portraits for the European election were updated, by Wikipedia volunteers,  on the Wikipedia articles of the candidates one day after publication.
The Dutch political party D66 lets creators upload shareable photos to Flickr. The benefits are that the photographer has followers who regurarly add photos to Wikipedia articles. These portraits for the European election were updated, by Wikipedia volunteers, on the Wikipedia articles of the candidates one day after publication.

This decision should to be part of the agreement between the person or organisation that pays for the content, the client, and the person or team producing the content, the creator(s). If a client wants to get all the credit, this means that the creator(s) involved have to hand over their copyright to the client before the content can be released under an open license. Although completely understandable, it is a bit contradictory to the idea of open content where the creator gets the credit. This non exhaustive list gives some things to consider for this decision:

  • Accounts: who has the necessary accounts and experience with these accounts?
  • Reach: who has the biggest reach within the target group, the client or the maker?
  • Following: who is already known for open content and has an online following of people that reuses that content?
  • Future content: who is most likely to keep putting out new open content (and thus constantly creating new interest in the material that is already available)?

Luckily there are some elegant ways to give credit to each other. Please see the the table below for a few examples.

Creator gets credit Client gets credit
Title Add “…commissioned by [client]” tot the title. Add “…made by [creator]” to the title.
Description Add information about the project and link to client website. Add information about and a link to the creator(s).
Tags Add tags related to the client and their projects, products and/or services. Add tags related to the creator(s) and their projects, products and/or services.
Copyright information Only mentions creator. Only mentions client.

Metadata
All kinds of electronic equipment, like photo cameras, audio recorders and video camera’s, have ever increasing posibilities to embed data into the files they produce. There are even more options to add metadata in the computer programs to organise and archive these files. Most of the times it’s easier to add this information when the data is imported than to edit the information later.

Creator gets credit Client gets credit
EXIF Data See Title and Description. See Title and Description.
Creation date Can be maintained Is advised to take out.
Geolocation Can be maintained Is advised to take out.

Usage data
The uploader has access to all kinds of usage data of the content that might be of interest to the other party. How many people have seen the video? How many people watched it entirely? Has it been downloaded and remixed? This kind of information is very valuable for the client and the creator. Some of this information is public, but most of the times the detailed information is only accesible to the uploader. Therefor it is advised to agree on sharing this kind of information with each other too.

Etc.Etc.Etc.

Creator gets credit Client gets credit
Statistics Maker shares statistics with client Client shares statistics with creator(s)
Embeds Maker shares embed data with client Client shares embed data with creator(s)